Let's eat!

Hi. My name's Carol, and I love food. No, you don't understand. I love food. If I were on the Titanic, I'd be in the galley (kitchen) eating up the chocolate pudding and the roasted quail. I go to most events, activities and parties just for the food. The company and the conversation are secondary. Here, I'll try to document everything that goes into my mouth. Aren't we excited? Oh, hey, are you gonna eat that?

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Genki Sushi Seahawks Sunday



Surprisingly, for his birthday dinner, Ed chose to go to Genki Sushi -- a cheap conveyor belt sushi place in Lower Queen Anne, Seattle -- over the fancy, five-star Metropolitan Grill for fancy, five-star steak. Part of it is was finance. Part of it was good food fast. Have you been there? The sushi variety is made even more enticing by its democracy, everybody can have their heart's desire, simply reach out and pick plates you desire.

That is, unless you're me and at the Genki Sushi earlier tonight. Right after a Seahawks game. Outgoing crowds causing traffic jams, prolonging our inevitable. Clogging up not just the arteries of the road toward nirvana (it took us twice as long to get there than usual) but inside the restaurant itself.

The Sunday Genki staff wasn't prepared for the influx, apparently. They were understaffed. Two guys out front had to fill so many special orders from the booths and the tables that there wasn't much variety of sushi on the conveyor belt--the whole reason for Genki's existence and fame.

Do I sound bitter? I am, a little.



I was staring daggers at the large party seated after us in the large booth still attached to the conveyor belt. Instead of picking plates off the conveyor belt, they immediately ordered off the menu, monopolizing the two sushi makers out front. So as a result, the conveyor belt had NOTHING new put on it for the entire time we were there for dinner.

After starving on just two pieces of sake (salmon), even I was forced to order off the menu--if I wanted to eat. But I did so begrudgingly. If it hadn't been for my friend Raquel and the special orders our sons required (mine is a picky eater who only goes for edamame -- which wasn't on the conveyor belt for once, miso and rice), I'd have starved to death.

At one point, I got excited because I saw one of the sushi guys preparing tuna and salmon with mayo and a blowtorch. Thinking they were for the conveyor belt, I felt my hope rise. Then, my hope dashed when my husband found out that ALL that sushi he was preparing was for a booth of 70,000 in front of us. The conveyor belt continued to circle with the same 10 sushi we saw coming in.



Call me nutty, but I go to Genki Sushi to pick off plates of sushi from the conveyor belt. That's the whole reason for going there. Otherwise, I'd go to a sushi restaurant. Dig? If people would just recognize Genki Sushi for what it's supposed to be, we wouldn't be sitting around starving because nobody on the staff has time to bother loading up the conveyor belt. Why not just close the restaurant down, dismantle the conveyor belt and just call it something else, like, Sushi Toyama? Stupid people.

In Hawaii, for the longest time, Genki had seats around the conveyor belt and a waiting line. If you wanted a booth, you went to Yanagi. Everybody understood the conveyor belt allure. Everybody endured terrible parking and long waits JUST to sit at the conveyor belt counter and see what was there to pick from. Very few people special-ordered, and only if everybody at the conveyor belt was taking your favorites. Other people special-ordered for catering or takeout, but they were very few and they were considered stupid. If you couldn't find a seat, you were out of luck, just go wait like everybody else, tough luck.



But I bet some bad apples started complaining to management about their fat butts needing booth seating and pretty soon you have the stupidity you have today at all Genki Sushi establishments. Idiots who come in with their ignorant entourage and treat Genki Sushi like it was a regular sit-down Japanese restaurant.

These are the stupid idiots who prevented me from plucking out my favorite treasures from the conveyor belt. I hope they're happy. Popularity destroys another institution.

On the only bright note, not having a lot of variety on the conveyor belt forced me to try new specialty sushi, like the one with cream cheese in it. Normally I disparage such haole-ized sushi and those who try it, but I did and it's not bad. It's not loaded with cream cheese. Just enough to flavor the rice and brightly colored raw fish (ahi, salmon). I even had rainbow roll, which was very good.

Other than these, some tempura rolls, scallop (not the pieces, the whole layer), and the kid drinks that taste like orange sherbet, there really was nothing else going on, like usual. No Tamago. No Ebi. No spicy tuna roll. They all went to the greedy pigs in the booths and tables too stupid and lazy to go to an actual Japanese sushi restaurant to be served.

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